The Literary Club

The Literary Club

Emily Brontë, feminism in the Victorian age

Women’s history in the domain of the arts and science, as well as in other domains, has been invisibilized since ancient times. The field of writing has also been a battle arena dominated by men.  Emily Brontë emerged, alongside her sisters, as one of the pillars of Victorian writing. The expansion of the feminist movement has been responsible for giving just recognition to many female figures that history and the patriarchy had tried to erase.
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Clarice Lispector: The Brazilian Writer Who Challenged Established Structures

To understand Clarice Lispector is to take a leap; like every great leap, it is scary yet liberating. Her work, complicated and strange, left its fingerprints on Latin American Literature and today more than ever seems to signpost a path. Lispector rebelled against the structures that absolutize or arrest feelings. 
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Women Who Run with the Wolves: Towards an Instinctive Reunion.

Far from the accounts, they used to tell girls in the 90s, perhaps wisdom was to be found in fables, in the knowledge from mouth to mouth that reached one’s ears and became misrepresented as it transitioned from generation to generation.  Clarissa Pinkola Estes, in her book ‘Women Who Run with the Wolves’, groups famous fables of different origins and brings to them an analysis where women find a typically abandoned identity, the Savage Woman.
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‘The Catch’ by Kenzaburõ Õe: articulating the necessity for change ...

In August, Japan remembered the fateful days of the nuclear explosions (in Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and 76 years of redemption following their warmongering engagements with other countries. Nevertheless, it’s curious to link certain tangible changes in Japanese society during the 20th Century and present changes with US imperialism. “The Catch” is a reflection of this.
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Lucia Berlin: the charm of the ordinary

Lucia Berlin was an American writer born in Juneau, the capital city of the state of Alaska, on November 12th, 1936. Her life was very unique, and, sometimes, complicated. She lived in many places, including El Paso, Santiago de Chile, Albuquerque, New York, and Mexico City, among others.
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It’s March 2022… Is The Winter’s ‘Tail’ behind us – ...

Shakespeare… To teach or not to teach: that is the question English teachers are deliberating cancelling Shakespeare due to his unwoke attitudes on race, sexuality, gender, and sophistication. They are also using his plays to lecture on topics like toxic masculinity and Marxism. 
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THEN AND NOW: THE RELEVANCE OF JANE AUSTEN’S PRIDE AND ...

Originally by Nuala Szler; Translated by Mercedes Pajuelo “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” That’s the opening line to Jane Austen’s most famous novel, Pride and Prejudice, first published on January 28th, 1813. 
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700 Years of Dante Alighieri

Originally by Nuala Szler; Translated by David Crowe The year 2021 ended as much in hope as it did in unexpected turbulence. No year could end without noise or avoid leaving a serpentine path towards the future. Nevertheless, the last days of 2021 have been, in many ways, special. 700 years have passed since the death of Dante Alighieri, 700 years! What are 700 years for literature?
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LOVE THROUGH LETTERS: VIRGINIA WOOLF AND VITA SACKVILLE-WEST

Love relationships that don’t comply with society’s hegemonic standards have been censored and harassed for ages and as a result, these relationships are concealed from the public for fear of rejection or repudiation. It’s not easy to suppress feelings, thus the traces of the attachment start to appear on the margins of everyday life, in the gaps between what’s expected. Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West are an example of this. For them, a dinner party or a social gathering were ...
The Literary Club

Gays The Word: London’s Safe Space For Queer Bookworms

Recently, I went on a trip to London, and amongst the many tourist spots I had planned, there was one location I knew I wanted to visit. As a queer girl obsessed with books, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to visit London’s LGBTQ+ bookstore Gays The Word. And so, on a cloudy Wednesday morning, I dragged my mum onto the tube with only one destination in mind.