Society

ActivismSociety

How BIPOC culture shapes sustainability  

Repurposing things is common practice in my house. From reusing plastic tupperware from the Chinese takeaway to mending clothes and passing down outfits from the older to the younger generation, my mother has instilled these practices in my sisters and me since we were young. By doing so, my mother has passed down the narrative of reducing waste to different generations. Culture shapes sustainability, especially for many immigrant families like mine.
PeopleSociety

The Misogyny and Sexist Double Standards on Love Island

The reality show, Love Island, is a staple for British summer nights. Young singles from the UK stay in a villa in Majorca, Spain for eight weeks in an attempt to find love, or at the very least, fame. Unfortunately, the misogyny and sexist double standards on Love Island seem to get worse and worse every year and have never been as apparent as in its 8th season, which has been airing on ITV2 every night for the past two ...
ActivismSociety

Pí Suruí: Indigenous Activism and Photography

From the Paiter Suruí indigenous community in Brazil, 24-year-old Pí Suruí is both a budding photographer and a psychology student. She has dedicated extensive time photographing other indigenous communities and is an activist for her people. Suruí photographed at COP 26 and saw closely the environment of the conference. She kindly refers to other indigenous communities as ‘relatives’ or ‘parente’ in Portuguese.
PeopleSociety

The Scarlet Lady: A Review of Sir Richard Branson’s newest ...

The pitter-patter of little feet. The giggles of a baby at the table next to you. The piercing scream of a toddler whose cookie has disappeared because she ate it. These are sounds you’ll NEVER hear on the spectacular new ocean liner, The Scarlet Lady. That’s because children are not now and will never be permitted on Virgin Cruises’ ships. The marketing director assured me. “Never,” he said.
PeopleSociety

An overlooked victory: the case of Bia Haddad inequality in ...

Bia Haddad Maia is a Brazilian tennis player who recently won the title of the WTA 250 of Nottingham. This important title is a monumental moment in her professional career and a landmark day for Brazilian tennis. She is the first to win a professional tournament on grass since Maria Esther Bueno won in Manchester in 1968.
PeopleSociety

Serial Killers: Society’s Strange Addiction

TW: Murder, physical and sexual abuse  Serial killers have attained celebrity status in society. Dropping the name of a well-known killer in a news headline is a sure-fire way to generate clicks. In a study by Wiest (2019), it was found that many news articles include the names of serial killers irrelevant to the murders being reported. This is either as a means of comparison or simply for their notoriety.
ActivismSociety

Seitō Magazine: the amplification of Japanese feminism

The fight for equal rights and conditions for women has existed since time immemorial. No matter what part, nook, or corner of the world one is from, women have always been fighting for what they deserve.  With the passing of the centuries, women who have belonged to different groups, castes, and societies have become more conscious of the misogyny that is all-encompassing and became aware of the change that needed to occur. These socio-economic metamorphoses have been achieved in an ...
ActivismSociety

What is ecofeminism and why is it relevant today?

Ecofeminism is a social movement and philosophy that looks at the connections between nature and women. As a social movement that centers on the protection of nature, it is a movement led by decolonial and indigenous movements, primarily by women of colour activists.
PeopleSociety

Ruby Bridges: The Girl Who Helped Change the Racial Paradigm ...

At only 6 years old, Ruby Bridges was the first person of Afro-American descent who went to a school that, until that moment, only allowed white boys and girls the possibility to study there.
PoliticsSociety

The Struggle of the Female Suffragist Movement: The First Progress

The suffragist movement could be seen as the first progress towards equal rights between women and men. Historically dating from the end of the 19th Century and the start of the 20th,  a group of women decided to fight for suffrage and have a voice and opinion in politics. It was a  nuanced fight between the suffragists and external political groups.