Arts

ArtsCulture

Evidence of Ancient Egypt Facilitating the Spread of Plagues

From the Nile to the Mediterranean: Tracing Egypt’s Footprint in Ancient Plague Outbreaks While it’s challenging to establish universally, there’s compelling evidence suggesting that ancient Egypt played a role in spreading infectious diseases throughout the Mediterranean. Numerous ancient reports on plague outbreaks point to Egypt as the source of pestilence that reached the Mediterranean.
ArtsCulture

Lost Botticelli Painting Found: A 40-Year Artistic Odyssey

Witness the revival of a cultural gem as the Naples Cultural Heritage Protection Unit announces the recovery of Botticelli’s “Virgin and Child.” Delve into the mysteries surrounding its disappearance and follow the unfolding story of its preservation and restoration.
ArtsCulture

Exploring Digital Art at the D’Orsay Museum: “Bonjour, Vincent” and ...

At the D’Orsay Museum in Paris, the exhibition “Bonjour, Vincent” has transcended conventional art boundaries by introducing a unique experience by integrating artificial intelligence. Using algorithms generated from the 900 letters written by Van Gogh during the 19th century, this digital recreation of the post-impressionist painter not only comes to life but also engages in interactive dialogues with visitors, responding to questions through a microphone and a screen.
ArtsCulture

The Allure of the Cabinet of Curiosities: A Journey Through ...

Immerse yourself in the world of the Cabinet of Curiosities, a historical marvel that has intrigued minds for centuries. Brimming with oddities and treasures, this intriguing collection serves as a window into the past, inviting us to explore the vast expanse of human knowledge and creativity.
ArtsCulture

Mafalda 60: Child of Revolution

Mafalda is the fruit of revolution. She was created in the early 1960s by the Argentinean cartoonist Joaquín Salvador Lavado Tejón, better known by his pen name Quino. Inspired by the sexual revolution movement, she was initially meant to be a part of a family advertisement for the electro-domestic company Mansfield. There were only two conditions: Mansfield appliances must be featured, and the characters’ names must start with the letter ‘M’.
ArtsCulture

Cassandra by Lesia Ukrainka 

Over a century after Lesia Ukrainka wrote her poetic drama Cassandra, based on the myth of Troy, it could not be more relevant in illustrating the challenge of female agency and Ukraine’s anti-colonial struggle. Ukrainka, born Larysa Kosach in 1871, was a writer, scholar and a Ukrainian woman from an intellectual, forward-thinking European class. Ukrainka was a polyglot who consistently used characters and themes from classical mythology in her work.
ArtsCulture

Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Legend

Jean-Michel Basquiat was born on December 22 1960 into a middle-class family in Brooklyn, New York. Basquiat was one of the most influential and internationally recognized African-American artists of the late twentieth century. His father was born in Port au Prince, Haiti, and his mother was a New York native of Puerto Rican descent. According to his claims, his father was physically violent and his mother was volatile. Despite suffering from depression, his mother made time to take him to ...
ArtsCulture

Lubaina Himid – Politics and Poetics of Everyday Life

Recently, I went on a trip to London – to the city that always feels like home to me and had the chance to feed my cultural appetite and curiosity with Lubaina Himid’s exhibition at Tate Modern. I was too excited that I booked the first entry slot of the day, woke up feeling very energised, put my headphones on, and walked across the Millennium Bridge under the beaming sun. I stopped for the hundredth time to capture the beauty ...
ArtsCulture

Catherine Abel: Woman and Eroticism in Contemporary Art

Catherine Abel was born in Australia in 1966 and started her artistic career when she moved to Paris in the year 2000. Her work was influenced by the historic art in Europe, with references like Pablo Picasso, George Braque, Salvador Dali, André Lhote, and Tamara Lempicka being the most notable.
ArtsCulture

María Izquierdo: between art and double Oppression

María Cenobia Izquierdo Gutiérrez, or simply María Izquierdo, was a Mexican artist who fought against the twin obstacles of the double oppression presented by a patriarchal-capitalist society. She was a woman, Latina, and an artist. Being divorced and heartbroken, she struggled against the monopoly of muralists such as Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozcos, and David Alfaro Siquieros and left works of art that would become known worldwide in her wake. She would be the first female Mexican painter to show ...